Mentoring

I’ve been fortunate to mentor a number of excellent undergraduate research assistants, summer interns, and thesis students in the last few years. You can find out more information about them below!

Undergraduate Thesis Advisees and Summer Interns


Ariana Hernandez, Summer Research Opportunity Program participant (B.A., 2019 expected)

Ariana will be applying to graduate school in social psychology in the fall of 2018

Ariana ran a study demonstrating that the strength with which people hold their implicit theories of intelligence moderates whether people assimilate toward the implicit theories conveyed by their organizations. For example, people who are certain that intelligence is malleable are able to hold onto that belief, even when they encounter organizations that suggest intelligence is fixed. However, those who are more doubtful tend to shift their beliefs toward being more fixed.

John Taylor, Undergraduate Thesis Student (B.A., 2018)

John started graduate school in social psychology at the University of Arizona in fall of 2018.

John investigated the effects of valence framing when one has to choose between two options that are closely valued. Previous research examining clear choices suggested that “opposing” a rejected option increased confidence and choice-consistent behavior compared to “supporting” a chosen option. John explored whether the opposite might be true when one had to choose between two equally valued options.

Mariah Willis, Undergraduate Thesis Student (B.A., 2018)

Mariah investigated the process through which people decide whether to accept or reject negative feedback. Her research was intended to provide a critical test of the dual motive model, which suggests that people are motivated to both defend and improve themselves. Her research provided a test of the critical hypothesis that these motives should conflict when people view themselves as changeable.

Mariah received a number of awards to support her research:

  • $400 Social and Behavioral Sciences Undergraduate Research Grant recipient
  • $2,000 Arts & Sciences Undergraduate Research Scholarship
  • $3,500 Undergraduate Education Summer Research Fellowship

Jennifer Eidemiller, Undergraduate Thesis Student (B.A., 2017)

Jennifer’s research examined the effects of construal level on willingness to take a test to determine if one is sexist. She found that high level construal rather than low level construal promoted willingness to test one’s sexism, consistent with the idea that high level construal promotes long term goals (to not be sexist), whereas low level construal promotes short term goals (to protect one’s self-esteem).

Jennifer received a number of awards to support her research:

  • $1,000 Social and Behavioral Sciences Undergraduate Research Grant recipient
  • $2,000 Arts & Sciences Undergraduate Research Scholarship
  • $3,500 Undergraduate Education Summer Research Fellowship

Research Assistant Mentoring


Supervised between three and ten RAs every semester. Facilitated discussion of selected research articles and development of research skills in regular RA meetings. Met with RAs individually to discuss graduate school and career plans.